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Amphibians:

Amphibians like Hufa melanastictus (toads) and Rana limnoclzaris (frog) often attack and cause a substantial fall in colony population. The detection of this problem generally requires close observation. When toads and frogs are preying heavily on the bee colonies, they scatter in front of the hive entrance their faecal dark brown droppings. If these dry faecal deposits are spread apart with a twig or brush, the remains of bee parts can be seen, confirming the severe attack on bees by frogs and toads. The amphibians will eat the bees. Amphibians do not eat the honey.

froggy.jpg

Damages:

Continuous predation by toads and frogs, results in a loss of colony strength. Some colonies with moderate or relatively large worker populations can withstand the predation and subsequently recover their full strength. Weaker colonies are at considerable risk, The attacking patterns of toads and frogs are quite similar. On arriving at the colony, the amphibians wait in the vicinity of the hive entrance, preying on passing bees. Colonies close to the ground provide easy access to the predators, for which guard bees at the hive entrance are easy preys. If the attackers are small enough to squeeze through the hive entrance of a relatively weak colony, the outcome is of devastating bee colony.

bees1com.jpg

Amphibians:

Amphibians like toads and frogs often attack and cause a huge fall in colony population. The detection of this problem generally needs close observation. When toads and frogs are preying on the bee’s colonies, they scatter in front of the hive entrance their faecal dark brown droppings. If these dry faecal deposits are spread apart with a twig or brush, the remains of bee parts can be seen, confirming the severe attack on bees by frogs and toads.

beee.jpg

Damages:

Continuous predation by toads and frogs, results in a loss of colony strength. Some colonies with moderate or relatively large worker populations can withstand the predation and subsequently recover their full strength. Weaker colonies are at considerable risk, The attacking patterns of toads and frogs are quite similar. On arriving at the colony, the amphibians wait in the vicinity of the hive entrance, preying on passing bees. Colonies close to the ground provide easy access to the predators, for which guard bees at the hive entrance are easy preys. If the attackers are small enough to squeeze through the hive entrance of a relatively weak colony, the outcome is of devastating bee colony.

froggy3.jpg

Control:

In some circumstances predation on honey bees by amphibians cannot be overlooked. The beekeeper should not look on the problem as a minor one. Some suggested control measures are:

(1) Placing the hives on stands 40 -60 cm high is usually a good protective measure.

(2)fencing it with fine mesh is somtimes a good idea.

(3) Trapping, baiting or poisoning is not a good idea.

bee hive off ground.jpg

Our Sources

Beekeeping: Pests of //honey Bees// - Inseda.org

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